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Arab Women Writers: A Critical Reference Guide, 1873-1999 by Radwa Ashour, Ferial J. Ghazoul

By Radwa Ashour, Ferial J. Ghazoul

This publication is a useful new reference resource and important overview of Arab girls writers from the 19th century to the tip of the twentieth.Arab women's writing within the smooth age begun with A'isha al-Taymuriya, Warda al-Yaziji, Zaynab Fawwaz, and different nineteenth-century pioneers in Egypt and the Levant. This exact examine - first released in Arabic in 2004 - seems on the paintings of these pioneers after which lines the improvement of Arab women's literature during the finish of the 20th century, and in addition features a meticulously researched, entire bibliography of writing by means of Arab ladies. within the first part, in 9 essays that disguise the Arab center East from Morocco to Iraq and Syria to Yemen, critics and writers from the Arab global research the beginning and evolution of women's writing in every one kingdom within the sector, addressing fiction, poetry, drama, and autobiographical writing.The moment a part of the quantity comprises bibliographical entries for over 1,200 Arab girls writers from the final 3rd of the 19th century via 1999. every one access encompasses a brief biography and a bibliography of every author's released works. This part additionally contains Arab women's writing in French and English, in addition to a bibliography of works translated into English.With its vast scope and broad examine, this publication is an necessary source for someone drawn to Arabic literature, women's reports, or comparative literature.

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Extra info for Arab Women Writers: A Critical Reference Guide, 1873-1999

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She emerges in the novel as a seeker, not for work or an external space, but for a non-masculine man who can compensate her for the loss and rescue her from her nightmares and loneliness. Jabbur’s language in her second novel, al-Ghirban wa-l-musuh al-bayda’ (The Ravens and the White Gowns) 1966, approaches a confessional mode,29 seeming to confirm the autobiographical elements suggested by the language of the first novel. Explicitly and clearly, Kawthar expresses LEBANON 25 her need for her father’s love.

Lina rebels against several male-dominated institutions on the domestic, social, economic, political, and cultural level. In so doing, she wages her two-pronged battle for liberation, as a woman and as an individual in society. Lina rejects society’s image of her. The link she makes between free choice, will, and responsibility for one’s actions is informed by Sartre’s existentialism and springs from a Beirut culture fostered by periodicals and translations. Lina’s character is marked by Western culture, but in the novel it is reformulated in relation to her reality from a social, nationalist, liberational perspective.

In so doing, she wages her two-pronged battle for liberation, as a woman and as an individual in society. Lina rejects society’s image of her. The link she makes between free choice, will, and responsibility for one’s actions is informed by Sartre’s existentialism and springs from a Beirut culture fostered by periodicals and translations. Lina’s character is marked by Western culture, but in the novel it is reformulated in relation to her reality from a social, nationalist, liberational perspective.

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