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An Outline of Sociology As Applied to Medicine by David L. Armstrong

By David L. Armstrong

Because the final version of this ebook, released in 1983, the textual content has been rewritten and rearranged to offer an up to date evaluation of the topic. The emphasis is on delivering a framework for knowing the connection among future health care and the society during which it happens

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An Outline of Sociology As Applied to Medicine

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Thus, a person with ten contacts a week had twice the social support as a person with five contacts. A major long-term investigation in the USA, the Alameda County study, reported that after allowing for other known factors in the cause of death, the extent of a person's social network corresponded to their risk of early mortality (Berkman and Syme, 1979). Their measure of social network was an amalgam of various aspects of social contact and critics could argue that it was somehow constructed to fit the mortality data.

In part this was a product of the movement of infectious epidemics through the community, but also nineteenth century epidemiologists noted that mortality rates varied by whether the area was urban or rural. They explained the difference in terms of environmental hazards, particularly those caused by poor sanitation. 2. With detailed mortality statistics, the nineteenth century epidemiologist was able to confirm that mortality and many causes of death were closely related to age. The first few years of life were found to be dangerous for the infant; thereafter mortality declined before it began its upward climb from middle age.

1. It is possible that it is not unemployment that causes ill health but another third variable which causes ill health and at the same time unemployment. It is known that working class men are more likely to be unemployed at any point in time compared with middle class men. In addition, and probably for independent reasons (see Chapter 7), working class men are likely to have more illnesses and to have higher mortality than middle class men. Therefore in any sample of unemployed men there is likely to be a higher proportion of working class men who in their turn are more likely to be ill.

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